The Boys of 84: Part 4 – Blown Away

February 6, 2004

Remembering a titanic cup campaign 20 years ago. Monday, 6th February 1984.

In his autobiography, World Light-Heavyweight Champion Archie Moore writes of his fight in 1955 with unbeaten World Heavyweight Champion Rocky Marciano ‘I knew that I could beat him, and early in the fight I threw the best punch I had ever thrown in my whole career. Marciano went down on his face, and you know that a man is hurt bad when he goes down on his face. But The Rock got up, and I knew that I would lose.”

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The Boys of 84: Part 3 – ‘And Cascarino’s clear – HE MUST SCORE!!’

January 31, 2004

Remembering a titanic cup campaign 20 years ago. Tuesday, 31st January 1984.

Only season-ticket holders and the usual hangers-on had tickets for this one, for everyone else it was pay on the night as Priestfield bulged with 15,339 eager to see whether Gills could break a then 76 year hoodoo by beating a side from the top division in a cup tie. And in the first minute, they nearly did. John Leslie got round the back of the Everton defence and crossed low, and they were all over the place before Peter Reid hacked the ball into Gordon Road.

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The Boys of 84: Part 2 – Goodison Glory

January 28, 2004

Remembering a titanic cup campaign 20 years ago. Saturday, 28th January, 1984.

It was an early start for the 4,000 Gills fans who were off to see one of the biggest FA Cup ties in the club’s history. Was it winnable? We certainly thought so – despite being a genuine football giant, Everton were not having a good season. They had been under the shadow of arch-rivals Liverpool for several years, and manager Howard Kendall was the latest Everton manager to feel the pressure. Defeat by Third Division Gillingham would see him off.

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The Boys of 84: Part 1 – Never look back? Never walk out!

January 7, 2004

Remembering a titanic cup campaign 20 years ago. Saturday, 7th January 1984.

‘Well, we’ve had this! I’m freezing and I’m going home to get the fire going.’ Words of defeat from my dad on a damp and bitter November afternoon in 1960 as Gills were losing a Second Round Cup Tie to Southend 2-1. He joined the hundreds drifting out. I stayed until the end. The old man couldn’t make out why I was beaming when I got in. Ha! Ha! Johnny Shepherd cracked in two in the last couple of minutes and we won 3-2. ‘I stayed ‘till the end against Southend’ was a badge of honour for years.

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